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Aug
06
2013

Jay Bilas wins Twitter for the Year…

Jay-BilasGreetings sports fans!!!  Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you know that Ed O’Bannon and some other athletes are suing the NCAA for profiting of their likenesses.

and Jay Bilas might have driven a truck through the NCAA’s defense vs. Ed O’Bannon.

USA TODAY Sports found the same thing could be done when Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron, Ohio State quarterback Braxton Miller and Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray’s names were typed into the search box as well. You could even plug in former Buckeyes quarterback Terrelle Pryor, who was suspended in 2011 after selling his own memorabilia, and his old OSU jersey would appear.

Though the site is copyrighted by Fanatics Retail Group, it is branded with the NCAA’s official logo and links prominently toNCAA.com, the NCAA’s commercial web site.

The search function quickly became a hot topic on Twitter as ESPN analyst Jay Bilas posted a stream of screengrabs from the site showing replica jerseys of athletes such as Clemson’s Tajh Boyd, Louisville’s Teddy Bridgewater and others.

Bilas told USA TODAY Sports that he goes on the NCAA website all the time just to see what they’re doing and what’s going on, and with all the current chaos surrounding Manziel, he decided to see what was on sale on its commercial site.

Bilas told USA TODAY Sports that he goes on the NCAA website all the time just to see what they’re doing and what’s going on, and with all the current chaos surrounding Manziel, he decided to see what was on sale on its commercial site.

Before discovering the search box, Bilas said he received a message from someone that said the site was putting out No. 2 jerseys with the word “football” on the back, which struck him as odd.

“I hadn’t seen that before and that’s the equivalent of putting his last name on there because it’s not like jerseys have the sport on the back,” Bilas said. “So clearly they were referring to Johnny Football.”

Then he noticed the search function in the top right corner of the site and took off from there, plugging in different players’ names.

“They’re selling their jerseys, pretending that it’s some sort of coincidence that all the value is in the school name and there’s no value in the player when just coincidentally, every time you see a jersey, it’s the team’s best player,” he said.

“It’s not about need. It’s about exploitation. Any time an entity or a person makes money off of another entity or person, while at the same time restricting that person or entity, that’s exploitation. It’s wrong to the point of being immoral when you really think about it.”

The NCAA declined comment on the matter when contacted by USA TODAY Sports, but around 4 p.m. ET the search function on the website had been disabled.

Please see some of the better Twitter screen grabs below from @JayBilas:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And I think we’re done here. Open up the wallet and settle, NCAA.


2 pings

  1. Has the NCAA lost it’s mind… again? » All Sports Discussion says:

    […] I think this has become indicative of the current state NCAA, from the botched handing of the Miami Hurricane’s investigation, to the NCAA practice of selling jerseys that suddenly stopped just over a week ago in the midst of the Johnny Manzeil controversy. Just check out Jay Bilas’s twitter timeline for the now legendary rant about the NCAA and those player jerseys. […]

  2. Has the NCAA lost it’s mind… again? | Sports Blog United says:

    […] I think this has become indicative of the current state NCAA, from the botched handing of the Miami Hurricane’s investigation, to the NCAA practice of selling jerseys that suddenly stopped just over a week ago in the midst of the Johnny Manzeil controversy. Just check out Jay Bilas’s twitter timeline for the now legendary rant about the NCAA and those player jerseys. […]

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